Another Thing...

There have been no dragons in my life,
only small spiders, and stepping on gum...

I could have coped with dragons
chroniclebooks:

One of our favorite moments from Comic-Con 2013: Jeffrey Brown signing a copy of Vader’s Little Princess for the sweetest Captain America you have EVER seen. 

Sweetest Cpt. America

chroniclebooks:

One of our favorite moments from Comic-Con 2013: Jeffrey Brown signing a copy of Vader’s Little Princess for the sweetest Captain America you have EVER seen. 

Sweetest Cpt. America

chels:

Been waiting for this GIF for what seemed like an eternity. 
(I promise I will get over this match, but not just yet.) 

chels:

Been waiting for this GIF for what seemed like an eternity. 

(I promise I will get over this match, but not just yet.) 

bemusedlybespectacled:

diglettdevious:

missrep:

GoldieBlox, engineering toys for girls, will now be available at Toys ‘R Us! 

omg the song

CAN WE TALK ABOUT HOW THIS BASHES THE MONOCHROME GIRL TOYS AISLE WITHOUT BASHING FEMININITY AND HAS THE MOST EPIC SOUNDTRACK IN AN AD OF ALL TIME?

You go Girl!

(via women-in-science)

chels:

brookhavenlab:

Your intrepid Brookhaven bloggers found this killer photo in our archives marked, simply, “Man In Tube, Bare Chested Work.” A little digging turned up his name and some of his backstory. Everett Hafner was a nuclear physicist at the Lab between 1948 and 1952. He had quite an eclectic life: he spent a year teaching physics in India, founded Hampshire College in Amherst, published several joke books, earned his pilot’s license, and was a pioneering electronic musician who hosted a weekly NPR show on electronic music. In short, he was a very talented guy.  
Here, we think he’s repairing a flange in a vacuum chamber of our first particle accelerator, the Cosmotron—check it out in the foreground of this other shot. Whatever he’s working on, he’s definitely working it.
And for the record, we no longer do shirtless physics here at the Lab. You know, because of safety, decorum, and all that.

Physics is hot.

Physics is hot.

chels:

brookhavenlab:

Your intrepid Brookhaven bloggers found this killer photo in our archives marked, simply, “Man In Tube, Bare Chested Work.” A little digging turned up his name and some of his backstory. Everett Hafner was a nuclear physicist at the Lab between 1948 and 1952. He had quite an eclectic life: he spent a year teaching physics in India, founded Hampshire College in Amherst, published several joke books, earned his pilot’s license, and was a pioneering electronic musician who hosted a weekly NPR show on electronic music. In short, he was a very talented guy.  

Here, we think he’s repairing a flange in a vacuum chamber of our first particle accelerator, the Cosmotron—check it out in the foreground of this other shot. Whatever he’s working on, he’s definitely working it.

And for the record, we no longer do shirtless physics here at the Lab. You know, because of safety, decorum, and all that.

Physics is hot.

Physics is hot.

The silly myth that the genius has to ‘suffer’ is the sly excuse of a society which does not care for its productive members

—László Moholy-Nagy  (via inkheartsilence)

(Source: jackrusher, via electricalice)

lookslikelibraryscience:

Jordan McGuffee works for Unite for Literacy (UniteforLiteracy.com and of course Facebook). We create and curate culturally and linguistically relevant digital picture books for small children. 
Jordan lives in Fort Collins, CO, USA. He’s a reader of course, and enjoys water sports and social media. He works to make and keep our books for free, for everybody, forever.

lookslikelibraryscience:

Jordan McGuffee works for Unite for Literacy (UniteforLiteracy.com and of course Facebook). We create and curate culturally and linguistically relevant digital picture books for small children. 

Jordan lives in Fort Collins, CO, USA. He’s a reader of course, and enjoys water sports and social media. He works to make and keep our books for free, for everybody, forever.

scishow:

Goodall, Fossey & Galdikas: Great Minds

Today we know that humans and chimpanzees share 99% of their DNA and that we have a lot in common. Not just how we look, but how we behave, form groups, defend our turf, and love each other. People didn’t always see other primates this way, but in the 1960s and ’70s, some amazing intrepid women came along to turn primatology on its hairy head. Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas studied chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans, respectively, and are the very definition of great minds of science. Their contributions to humanity’s knowledge about its closest living relatives is the subject of today’s SciShow: Great Minds.

Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-5RFg

(via women-in-science)